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West Bank Closures Ė Salfit
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, 2004.
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The Isolated Life of a Refugee Family Trapped Between the Wall/Barrier and a Settlement Fence
United Nations Relief and Works Agency, 2004.
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An Israeli security man at the construction site of a new section of the separation fence in the West Bank Palestinian village of Masíha.
Photo: Ahikam Seri, 2003.

Concrete wall, a Palestinian house and an Israeli house at the boundary between the West Bank Palestinian village of Mascha and the Israeli settlement of Elkanah. The Amer family house is the only house in Masíha left on the Israeli side of the fence.
Photo: Ahikam Seri, 2003.

Maria Amer, a Palestinian woman from the West Bank village of Masíha, sweeps the dust from her front yard, where a new section of the separation fence is being constructed. The Amer family house is the only house in Mascha left on the Israeli side of the fence.
Photo: Ahikam Seri, 2003.

View from one of the two of Masíhaís Ďofficialí gates in the separation barrier, with Elkana settlement in the background
Photo: Eva Simon, 2004.

The Amersí home with their private gate in the separation barrier in the village of Masíha adjacent to Elkana settlement
Photo: Eva Simon, 2004.

The Amersí home with their private gate in the separation barrier in the village of Masíha adjacent to Elkana settlement
Photo: Eva Simon, 2004.

Rabbis from the Rabbinic Assembly (Conservative Movement) visiting the Amersí home which is surrounded on all sides by the barrier on the outskirts of Masíha. The settlers of Elkana didnít want the barrier along their fence and the family refused to move. They have a private gate to move in and out of Masíha.
Photo: Arik Ascherman, February 2004.

A poster of service provision funded by USAID Deir Ballut. The barrier is scheduled to take a great deal of land in this village.
Photo: Arik Ascherman, March 2004.

Rabbis for Human Rights

ďThe most difficult dilemmas are not those in which there is a choice whether or not to violate a human right. The challenge is when we must choose between one right and another, in deciding which harm to cause. Recent events demonstrate how Israel shot itself in the foot by creating an unnecessary conflict of rights.

[Ö] It is beyond RHRís mandate to get into the question of whether or not Israel should build the Barrier. This is for politicians and defense experts to decide. However the ROUTE of the barrier makes it a human right issue because the land confiscated to build the Barrier and the restricted access to the lands between the barrier and the Green Line. Were the Barrier to be located on the Green Line or the Israeli side, Israel could close the gates in the Barrier in order to protect my family and fellow Israelis without endangering the livelihood of the farmers of Jayyus.

[Ö] To the extent that we believe in the intrinsic worth of every single human being. Each created in Godís image, there is no justification for creating an unnecessary conflict between Israeli right to self defense and the Palestinian right to work their land and support themselves with dignity.Ē

Rabbi Arik W. Ascherman, Rabbis for Human Rights / Maariv, October 20, 2003.